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All Vision Special Reports

Glaucoma and Your Genes

Researchers understand much about how glaucoma damages the eye, and over the past two decades they've gained a better understanding of why it happens. In a small but growing number of cases, they're finding that genetic defects are responsible for this potentially blinding disease. More...

Your Glaucoma Treatment Options

yedrops are the most common treatment for glaucoma, a vision-threatening disorder that affects more than two million Americans. But for about 10% of patients, eyedrops are not sufficient. In those cases, laser therapy or surgery is usually recommended to prevent further vision loss. More...

What You Should Expect After Cataract Surgery

You've decided to have cataract surgery, and the doctor has explained the procedure. But what can you expect after the surgery is over? This guide can help answer your questions about what lies ahead. Within the First Several Days of Cataract Surgery: It is very important not to rub or press on your eye after cataract surgery, even though you may have some itching, tearing, and mild discomfort. This discomfort can be relieved by taking… More...

4 Promising Treatments for AMD

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Glaucoma: A Family Matter

When it comes to glaucoma, family ties might not be a good thing. Open-angle glaucoma, which accounts for 90% of glaucoma cases, has a familial component and, therefore, is in part due to heredity. However, blood relatives of people with glaucoma often don't realize that they, too, are at risk. If you or someone in your family has glaucoma, you'll want to read and share this Special Report – it could save a loved one's… More...

How the Eye Works

If you are age 50 or older, there's a good chance you're concerned about eventually developing one of the four common eye diseases that affect older people -- cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and – for those with diabetes -- diabetic retinopathy. Yet most of us rarely consider the complex process that enables us to see the world around us – until our vision is threatened. In this Special Report, Johns Hopkins illustrates how the eye works. More...

Advice To Help You See Better When You Drive

Each time drivers in the United States renew their driver's license a vision test is required. Right? Wrong. Surprisingly, regular vision tests aren't required everywhere. And according to a recent report by the Vision Council of America, of the 10 states with the highest number of fatal car crashes, four require no vision screenings after the initial license application and four only require screenings every eight or more years. … More...

Learning More About Antioxidants and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

The National Eye Institute is sponsoring a second study – AREDS 2 -- to learn more about the impact of high-dose vitamin and mineral supplements on the progression of age-related macular degeneration. Age-related macular degeneration has early and late forms. The late forms can cause gradual or abrupt central vision loss, and until recently this vision loss was irreversible in most people. These late forms of age-related macular degeneration are estimated to affect over 1.75… More...

Herpes Virus and Vision Loss

Health After 50, www.healthafter50.com
In May 2006, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new vaccine for people over the age of 60 who have had chickenpox. Why is this good news for your vision? Because the herpes virus that causes chickenpox also causes shingles, a very painful rash that could break out on your face and threaten your vision. … More...

Farsighted? LASIK Isn’t Your Only Option

More than one million LASIK surgeries are performed in the United States each year. But despite LASIK’s widespread use, for those 12 million Americans with farsightedness, it’s no longer the only -- or always the best -- option. LASIK, which stands for laser-assisted in-situ keratomileousis, is a surgical procedure that uses a laser to reshape the cornea. When people have hyperopia, better known as farsightedness, they also tend to have flatter corneas than people who… More...

Vision Disorders Glossary

The Vision Disorders Glossary from the Health After 50 is derived from The Johns Hopkins White Paper: Vision. More...

Cornea Thickness -- A Risk Factor for Glaucoma

Glaucoma, a condition that can lead to blindness by damaging the optic nerve, was once thought to be caused by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP)—the pressure exerted by fluid within the eye. But even people with normal IOP can suffer damage to the optic nerve, and IOP is now considered a risk factor for—rather than a cause of—glaucoma. Recently, researchers also discovered a new risk factor for glaucoma—cornea More...

Artificial Vision -- New frontiers in sight

Health After 50, www.healthafter50.com
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Special Genetics Update -- The role of heredity in age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma

The Conundrum of Research One day, research in molecular genetics will open many doors in terms of the diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases such as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. Overall, however, we’re not there yet. Challenges include the following: Macular Degeneration and Glaucoma: We have a gene, but no test. For many years, ophthalmologists have known that age-related macular degeneration tends to run in certain families. The strongest evidence yet of a genetic component to macular degeneration came last spring, when four independent teams of researchers came up with the same finding: People who inherit a particular form of one gene have a 3–7 fold greater risk of developing age-related macular degeneration. More...

Dealing with a Detached Retina

Nearly everyone experiences floaters—small dots, lines, clouds, or “cobwebs” across the visual field—from time to time. This phenomenon is caused by shadows cast on the retina by microscopic structures within the vitreous humor (a thick, gel-like substance that fills the back of the eyeball behind the lens). Seeing flashes of light, which occurs when this fluid shifts, is another common ocular phenomenon. More...

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