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All Osteoporosis Special Reports

Talking About Hip Fractures with Dr. Bellantoni

In this Special Report, Michele F. Bellantoni, M.D., associate professor of medicine and medical director of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Care Center, discusses why hip fractures can be so difficult for older people and what you can do to help ensure a successful recovery. More...

Osteoporosis: Not Just a Woman’s Disease

Approximately 14 million American men have or are at risk for osteoporosis. As with women, men with osteoporosis have an increased risk of fracture. In fact, one third of all osteoporosis-related fractures occur in men, and one of every five men will experience such a fracture at some point in his life. To put this into perspective, after age 60, a man's risk of hip or spinal fracture is similar to his risk of developing prostate cancer. More...

Osteopenia: To Treat or Not to Treat?

Preosteoporosis, also known as osteopenia, refers to bones that are thinner than normal but aren't quite thin enough to be labeled osteoporosis. An estimated 10 million Americans have osteoporosis, but 34 million more -- 80% of them women -- may have osteopenia. The question for doctors: Should everyone with osteopenia be treated to ward off osteoporosis and fractures? If not, who really does need treatment and who can safely skip it? … More...

Osteoporosis and Digestive Disorders

When you think of the ways a digestive disorder can affect your life, bone fractures probably don't come to mind. But some digestive problems or their treatments can increase your risk of osteoporosis and lead to broken bones. Lactose intolerance is the most common example of a digestive disorder that can weaken bones, but it's not the only one. People with untreated celiac disease and those who take corticosteroids or proton pump inhibitors for their… More...

Is it Ever Okay To Discontinue Your Osteoporosis Medication?

Have you ever run out of your osteoporosis medication and waited days, weeks, or even months before you refilled the prescription? Such behavior is all too common. Half of all individuals with osteoporosis stop taking their medication for months at a time, then begin using it regularly again. But just as yo-yo dieting isn't a good way to lose and maintain weight, stopping and restarting prescription medicine for osteoporosis is not the best way to… More...

6 Exercises To Help Build Bone Strength and Help Prevent Osteoporosis

Long-term data confirm that the combination of increased physical activity and improved nutrition does prevent bone loss. Johns Hopkins’ experts report on a study from the University of Arizona, Tucson, on six bone-building exercises which could help prevent healthy people from developing osteoporosis. Exercise and adequate calcium are two of the three essentials for preventing osteoporosis. Vitamin D is the third. Regular exercise can help limit bone loss, improve your balance and coordination, and strengthen the leg and torso muscles that help you stand upright. More...

Calcium Supplements Still Count

Health After 50, www.healthafter50.com
Johns Hopkins professor Michele Bellantoni, M.D discusses the importance of taking calcium supplements despite the disappointing results of the Women’s Health Initiative trial. Health After 50 has long recommended calcium supplements with vitamin D to help prevent bone loss. Recently, the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), a group of large clinical trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, found little to support this recommendation—or did it? While the media was quick to report that calcium supplements don’t work, experts at Johns Hopkins caution women to talk to their doctors before they throw out their pills. More...

The Bone-Protecting Benefits of Vitamin D

When it comes to vitamin D, a few minutes in the sun is all you need, correct? Well, that depends. As it turns out, that is easier said than done for many of us. Draw a rough line across the country from San Francisco to Richmond, Virginia. If you live north of that line, it’s impossible to get enough sun exposure during the winter months to maintain adequate blood levels of vitamin D. And even during the summer, you may not be getting enough vitamin D. That’s especially true if you spend a great deal of time inside, out of the heat—or, ironically, if you’re particularly meticulous about using sunscreen, covering up, and seeking the shade when you’re outside. More...

Treating Osteoporosis with Forteo

Osteoporosis occurs when old bone breaks down faster than new bone is formed. Treatments for osteoporosis—such as Fosamax (alendronate), Actonel (risedronate), Evista (raloxifene), and hormone replacement therapy—all slow bone loss by reducing the rate at which bone breaks down. But another way to treat osteoporosis is to stimulate the formation of new bone. Researchers have worked for many years on the development More...

Osteopenia -- A Precursor to Osteoporosis

Loss of bone mineral density (BMD) that is not severe enough to be considered osteoporosis is referred to as osteopenia. The term comes from the Latin osteo (bone) and the Greek penia (poverty). In osteopenia, as in osteoporosis, bone formation is inadequate to compensate for normal bone loss. Osteopenia is more common in women than in men, typically occurs in people age 50 and over, and osteopenia is considered a risk factor for osteoporosis as well as for fractures. More...

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