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Talking About the Glycemic Index

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The glycemic index of a particular food is determined by the rise in blood glucose (sugar) during the two hours after its ingestion in comparison with the glucose response to an equivalent amount of carbohydrate in a standard food like white bread.

The glycemic index of white bread is defined as 100. Foods with a higher glycemic index than 100, like instant rice, cause a faster and higher rise in blood glucose than white bread; by contrast, the glycemic index for kidney beans is only 38, which means that the blood glucose after eating this low-glycemic index food increases by only about one-third as much as after eating an equivalent amount of white bread.

Because people with diabetes need to control their blood glucose, the glycemic index might seem like an important tool for helping them choose foods. But Health After 50 nutritional guidelines by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) conclude that people with diabetes don't have to restrict their food choices to those low on the glycemic index. Rather, the amount of carbohydrate consumed each day is more important in determining the body's glucose response than the glycemic index of each individual carbohydrate.

Many nutritious foods, such as corn, carrots and raisins, are high on the glycemic index, but that doesn't mean they should be eliminated. Still, some carbohydrates are preferred to others because they have more fiber or vitamins and other nutrients. For instance, fruits and whole-grain breads are better carbohydrate sources than candy or white bread. The ADA recommends getting carbohydrates from whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes and low-fat milk. People with diabetes should consult a doctor, nutritionist or dietitian for help in balancing these and other foods.

Posted in Diabetes on November 11, 2015


Medical Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute for the advice of a physician. Click here for additional information: Health After 50 Disclaimer


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Health After 50 Alerts registered users may post comments and share experiences here at their own discretion. We regret that questions on individual health concerns to the editors cannot be answered in this space.

The views expressed here do not constitute medical advice, and do not represent the position of Scientific American Health After 50 or Remedy Health Media, LLC, which has no responsibility for any comments posted on this site.


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OTHERWISE , DELETE , DELETE , DELETE ! ! !

Posted by: SAjem73131 | January 21, 2016 10:19 AM

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