Sign Up For FREE
Health After 50 Alerts!

We value your privacy and will never rent your email address

All Colon Cancer Alerts

Ask the Expert: Is New At-Home Test a Replacement for Colonoscopy?

Cologuard's appeal is that, unlike a colonoscopy, it’s noninvasive and it doesn’t require overnight emptying of the bowels by drinking an ill-tasting solution. More...

Treating Fecal Incontinence

The inability to control your bowels can lead to embarrassment and cause you to avoid social situations, but fecal incontinence is often treatable. More...

Fast Facts: What Are the Causes of Colorectal Cancer?

Increasing age, polyps, ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, dietary factors and obesity are just some of the risk factors for this type of cancer. More...

Study: Colon Cancer Screening Often Overused in Older Patients

A recent study finds that older adults with limited life expectancy frequently receive colon cancer screening, while many ages 65 to 75 with a 10-year or greater life expectancy are not screened. More...

Fiber and Colorectal Cancer Prevention: What the Research Says

The role of dietary fiber in helping to prevent the development of colorectal adenomas, which are the precursor to colorectal cancer, has always been a bit vague. A recent review of medical literature, however, suggests that fiber does indeed have a protective effect. More...

Got polyps? Here's What Your Colonoscopy Screening Schedule May Look Like

For most people colonoscopy does not need to be performed very often.But you’ll be advised to come back sooner if you’ve had precancerous polyps removed (polypectomy) during your colonoscopy. The timing for your subsequent screenings will depend on the number, size and types of polyps found; their location in your colon; and other risk factors for developing colorectal cancer. More...

The Latest Cancer Prevention Strategy: Weight-Loss Surgery?

New research reported in Obesity Surgery shows that bariatric surgery may reduce the risk of cancer in morbidly obese patients (BMI of 40 and above), although the “how” is not yet clear. More...

Colonoscopy Prep: Getting It Right

Let's be honest: Preparing for a colonoscopy can be a challenge. But the procedure saves lives. A colonoscopy can detect polyps -- growths that are usually harmless but can develop into cancer. And the best step you can take toward a successful colonoscopy is proper preparation. More...

Colonoscopy: Quality Matters

The effectiveness of colonoscopy in preventing colon cancer depends on the detection and removal of abnormal growths -- adenomas and polyps. Adenoma detection rates (ADR) and polyp detection rates (PDR) vary substantially among endoscopists, so researchers have been trying to identify quality measures that ensure consistent, high-quality exams. More...

Are You at Risk for Interval Cancer?

Nearly 20 years ago, authors of the National Polyp Study reported that colonoscopy prevents cancer, and the most recent data to come out of that long-running trial support the hypothesis that colonoscopy saves lives. Some patients, however, develop colorectal cancers, often called interval cancers, after a negative colonoscopy. Interval cancer is defined as cancer occurring in patients who had undergone colonoscopy six to 36 months prior to diagnosis. More...

Obesity: A Risk Factor for Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal polyps are small, noncancerous (benign) clumps of cells that grow in the rectum and colon. Over the course of 10 to 15 years, some of these polyps -- usually the ones that are larger than a pea -- can become cancerous. More...

Rethinking Age Limits for Colorectal Cancer Screening

If you think you're off the hook for a colonoscopy after age 75 because you're past the recommendation age, don't be so sure. A new study says that if you've never had a screening for colorectal cancer and are older than 75, you may still need one. More...

Colonoscopy: Screening Recommendations

Because colonoscopy allows direct inspection of the colon and also allows a physician to remove any suspicious growths, experts have long assumed that colonoscopy screening is the best test for reducing the risk of developing colorectal cancer. More...

Taking a Close Look at Colonoscopy

Because colonoscopy allows direct inspection of the colon and also allows a physician to remove any suspicious growths, experts have long assumed that colonoscopy screening is the best test for reducing the risk of developing colorectal cancer. In fact, many health experts credit the increasing use of colonoscopy, along with other screening tests, for playing a significant role in the decline in colorectal cancer rates over the past 20 years. More...

How to Interpret the Signs and Symptoms of Colorectal Cancer

In this excerpt from our Special Report, Colon Cancer: Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment, Dr. Ross C. Donehower, Director of the Division of Medical Oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, answers questions on diagnosing colorectal cancer. More...

 Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 next>>

 Displaying 1 through 15 of 100

Log-in:

Forgot Password?


COME SEE WHAT'S NEW IN THE

BOOKSTORE!


Health After 50 Bookstore


Health Topic Pages